quarrel#

quarrel#
quarrel n Quarrel, wrangle, altercation, squabble, bickering, spat, tiff are comparable when they mean a dispute marked by anger or discord on both sides. The same distinctions in implications and connotations are found in their corresponding verbs, quarrel, wrangle, altercate, squabble, bicker, spat, tiff
Quarrel usually implies heated verbal contention, but it stresses strained or severed relations which may persist even after verbal strife has ceased
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patch up a quarrel

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she hated any kind of quarrel . . . she shuddered at raised voices and quailed before looks of hate— Stafford

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the middle class had taken over the reins. It quarreled with James I, beheaded Charles I— Barr

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Wrangle implies undignified and often futile disputation with noisy insistence on each person's opinion
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a vulgar wrangle was unknown, and indeed it was only among the upper servants that . . . jealous friction existed— Sackville-West

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makes them wrangle interminably about petty details— La ski

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Altercation and the rare verb altercate imply fighting with words as the chief weapons, though blows may also be connoted
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I have an extreme aversion to public altercation on philosophic points— Franklin

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Lydia, foreseeing an altercation, and alarmed by the threatening aspect of the man, attempted to hurry away— Shaw

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it becomes us not ... to altercate on the localities of the battle— Lytton

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Squabble stresses childish and unseemly wrangling over a petty matter; it does not necessarily imply anger or bitter feeling
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they had always squabbled . . . but their scenes, with the shouting, the insults, the threats, and the flare-ups of mutual revulsion had gradually increased— Farrell

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a mere squabble in the children's schoolroom— Moorehead

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Bickering and bicker imply constant and petulant verbal sparring or interchanges of cutting remarks; they suggest an irritable mood or mutual antagonism
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the tearing worries of political snarls, of strife between capital and labor, of factional bickeringSulzberger

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though men may bicker with the things they love, they would not make them laughable in all eyes, not while they loved them— Tennyson

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Spat also implies an insignificant cause but, unlike squabble and bicker, it suggests an angry outburst and a quick ending without hard feelings
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it wasn't a fight, really—more of a spat than anything else— Heggen

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a teen-ager who ... is spatting with her mother over unchaperoned dates— Time

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Tiff differs from spat chiefly in implying a disagreement that manifests itself in ill humor or temporarily hurt feelings
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at the trial circumstantial evidence piled up against him, including his earlier tiff. .. which was offered as a motive— Hilton

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he retired after tiffing with Hitler— Hal Boy le

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Analogous words: *brawl, broil, fracas, melee, row, rumpus, scrap: contention, dissension, conflict, difference, variance, strife, *discord
quarrel vb wrangle, altercate, squabble, bicker, spat, tiff (see under QUARREL n)
Analogous words: *contend, fight, battle, war: dispute, agitate, argue, *discuss
Contrasted words: *agree, concur, coincide

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • Quarrel — Quar rel, n. [OE. querele, OF. querele, F. querelle, fr. L. querela, querella, a complaint, fr. queri to complain. See {Querulous}.] 1. A breach of concord, amity, or obligation; a falling out; a difference; a disagreement; an antagonism in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Quarrel — Quar rel, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Quarreled}or {Quarrelled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Quarreling} or {Quarrelling}.] 1. To violate concord or agreement; to have a difference; to fall out; to be or become antagonistic. [1913 Webster] Our people quarrel with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Quarrel — Quar rel, v. t. 1. To quarrel with. [R.] I had quarelled my brother purposely. B. Jonson. [1913 Webster] 2. To compel by a quarrel; as, to quarrel a man out of his estate or rights. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Quarrel — Quar rel, n. [OE. quarel, OF. quarrel, F. carreau, LL. quadrellus, from L. quadrus square. See {Quadrate}, and cf. {Quadrel}, {Quarry} an arrow, {Carrel}.] 1. An arrow for a crossbow; so named because it commonly had a square head. [Obs.] [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • quarrel — ► NOUN 1) an angry argument or disagreement. 2) a reason for disagreement. ► VERB (quarrelled, quarrelling; US quarreled, quarreling) 1) have a quarrel. 2) ( …   English terms dictionary

  • Quarrel — est un personnage de James Bond. Il est natif des îles Caïmans résidant dorénavant en Jamaïque. James Bond le rencontre pour la première fois dans le roman Requins et services secrets. Quarrel est une aide précieuse pour James Bond, tant par sa… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • quarrel — [n] disagreement affray, altercation, argument, battle royal*, beef*, bickering*, brannigan*, brawl, breach, broil*, catfight*, combat, commotion, complaint, contention, controversy, difference, difference of opinion, difficulty, disapproval,… …   New thesaurus

  • quarrel — quarrel1 [kwôr′əl, kwär′əl] n. [ME quarel < OFr < ML querellus < VL * quadrellum, dim. of L quadrus, a square] 1. a bolt or arrow with a quadrangular head, shot from a crossbow 2. a small, diamond shaped or square pane of glass, as in a… …   English World dictionary

  • Quarrel — Quar rel, n. [Written also quarreller.] One who quarrels or wrangles; one who is quarrelsome. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • quarrel — index altercation, argument (contention), bicker, brawl, challenge, collide (clash), commotion …   Law dictionary

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